Women Missing in Modesto Area

The idea that a serial killer is responsible for Laci's death has generally been scoffed at.  People find it hard to believe that a serial killer would target pregnant women.  These people might think twice if they knew how many pregnant women are missing in California, and especially from the Modesto area. 

We have done some very interesting research on the number of missing women -- pregnant women -- in the DOJ records.  Their disappearances are unsolved.  Perhaps because no one in LE is looking for a common denominator that identifies this as a serial killer pattern.  Reviewing this information might change some minds about the possibility that a serial killer is responsible for Laci's murder.

Click here to search the CA DOJ database and get updated information on a missing person in California. 

4Case Stories

4Some things in Common

4Perry Monroe

 

Case Stories

Thousands of Californians vanish each year, far from the glare of the media spotlight. As of Dec. 31, 2001, more than 35,000 adults 19,785 men and 15,357 women were listed in the state Justice Department's missing persons database. Of those, more than 4,300, or about 12 percent, disappeared under unknown or suspicious circumstances.  In Modesto, at least 10 women are missing, several under suspicious circumstances.  They don't all get the media spotlight like Chandra Levy or Laci Peterson, but they are missing nonetheless, and perhaps there is some connection among some of them that links to a serial killer.

Rarely getting any media attention, these vanished women may never be found.  One mother expresses the pain that all must feel:

When Elizabeth Smart was found in a Salt Lake City suburb, nine months after she was snatched at knifepoint from her bedroom, Lynsie Ekelund's mother sent the family a congratulatory e-mail. But inside, she seethed.

"My daughter is just as important as any other missing person out there," she said. "I should've been happier for Elizabeth Smart's family, but in my heart, I asked: 'Why couldn't it have been me?'" She pauses, choking down tears.

"I want something good to happen to my daughter."

Some things in Common

One problem with identifying a serial killer is police departments operate in a vacuum.  There doesn't seem to be any central investigative team in the state that looks specifically for evidence of a serial killer, much less one that works among different states.  Our researchers, amateurs without specialized training, have noted some very obvious common factors in several of the disappearances/murders, especially with those in the area of Modesto or the SF Bay.

Perry Monroe

    
Another common factor is the number of bodies found in water, suggesting a fascination with water, or with cleanliness.  We have also completed extensive research on Perry Monroe, who is implicated in the murder of Ladonna Milan.

Milan was murdered in Boulder City, Nevada, but 29 year old Monroe lived in Alameda, California, with his parents.  He was found sleeping in a car in Fresno when he was arrested.  He grew up in Alameda, and attended the University of California at Davis.  Monroe began a four-week road trip through Utah, Colorado, Kansas, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia and Florida on June 6 and Milan disappeared in Nevada on June 22.

Las Vegas police Lt. Tom Monahan quickly enlisted the aid of Police Departments in other states to determine if Monroe was a serial killer, but just as quickly ridiculed the suggestion Monroe may have been responsible for Laci Peterson's death. He was so annoyed at the suggestion that he immediately called the MPD to tell them there was absolutely no connection.  We find this very strange.

Monroe apparently used a hack saw to dismember Milan.  He put her torso, arms, and legs in the fishing pond at Veteran's Memorial Lake, and the hands were found in Monroe's car.  The head and feet were not found at either location. 

Homicide experts initially believed Milan's killer had prior experience at handling dead things, but nothing in Monroe's background suggested he was a predator or prone to violence, according to early reports on the story.

Monroe's case was disposed of very quickly and quietly as he was committed to a mental institution.